Thursday, April 17, 2014

Nobody Wants To Get Blasted

 
Just recently, I came across an e-book called Conversations, Not Campaigns.  The title caught my attention, if only because it was aligned with my personal views about marketing: Most people don't want to be "sold" to. Think about it: Do you want to be campaigned to, and treated like a gigantic walking wallet?  No, you'd probably prefer to be a part of a conversation, and treated like an intelligent human being. The psychology is simple.
 
Gone are the days of batch and blast. The bigger-is-better, hard-sell, batch-and-blast mentality is now the dinosaur of modern day digital marketing. Contemporary buyers expect personal and relevant emails on a non-disruptive schedule. Bottom line: Nobody wants to get blasted.
 
While most marketers are now on board about the importance of content marketing, can you put your finger on what really makes your content engaging?
 
Engaging content should stimulate organic dialogue.  It's all about a relationship-oriented mindset, which means:
  • Being spoken with instead of talked to
  • Dialogues instead of narratives
  • Personalization instead of classic automation

Much of this may sound like common sense when it comes to your digital marketing efforts and the volume of customers and prospects you're trying to retain and acquire, but the human touch often takes a backseat to technology's ability to automate.

Less blasting...more engaging!

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To share common sense lessons learned with 40-plus years experience in marketing, sales and as a B2B publisher.

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I'm really just a "mature" guy picking up experience along the way. If only by osmosis, I've observed what works and what doesn't work under the marketing umbrella -- with 11 years in sales and marketing at Procter & Gamble; 30-plus years in B2B publishing (including three years as a publisher); and 1,000's of calls on every size company starting with the likes of Microsoft and Hewlett-Packard all the way down to small, brash start-ups.

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