Monday, June 25, 2012

Lead Generation Techniques



New research about the web shows that only nine percent of prospects fill out a form required to access additional information.  Instead, letting prospects download without filling out a form, but then thanking them while asking more about their needs results in a a 45% form completion rate.

People hate filling out forms.  They hate giving personal information.  However, if you do something useful for them first, they are more likely to give you that information.

Web marketing and communication is about helping prospects along their way rather than getting in their way. Once they're on your website, don't try to get attention.  Rather, pay attention to what the prospect wants to do.  Make decisions based on evidence of actual behavior on your site.  Use facts, not opinions.

Marketing on the web is more about being found when prospects are searching for solutions or products or services like yours.  Prospects are in control when they visit your website.  You simply need to figure out how to help them buy, matching your marketing/selling process to their buying process, not just try to sell them or make them fit into your sales process.  

Try asking only a few key questions (name, title, email) with an offer for additional information thus capturing the lead when they hit submit.  Then, ask additional questions on a second page.  According to this new research, this approach doubles the number of captured leads -- and nearly 45% of them answer the second set of questions as well.

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To share common sense lessons learned with 40-plus years experience in marketing, sales and as a B2B publisher.

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I'm really just a "mature" guy picking up experience along the way. If only by osmosis, I've observed what works and what doesn't work under the marketing umbrella -- with 11 years in sales and marketing at Procter & Gamble; 30-plus years in B2B publishing (including three years as a publisher); and 1,000's of calls on every size company starting with the likes of Microsoft and Hewlett-Packard all the way down to small, brash start-ups.

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