Thursday, February 23, 2017

Tips For Better Email Marketing - Part II















With Part I, I suggested that a lot of your email recipients may scan your email without reading all the copy.  That's why you want to have a clear call-to-action button that's easy to spot for even the quickest of email scanners.  Without a call-to-action button, you won't be asking your recipients to take any action that actually benefits them -- and the potential growth of your sales.  For example, you might put a call-to-action to download a free white paper or video that describes new strategies for using your product.

Add links to your images.  Your ultimate goal with email marketing is to get prospects to click through to a web page on your site.  One way to increase the clickthrough without littering the copy with links is to add a link to your images in the email. 

Include noticeable text links.  In general, it's a good idea to link to your featured offer in multiple places in addition to the clear and focused call-to-action button.  In addition to your main call-to-action buttons and images, consider including a noticeable text link (or two).  Having more links increases the opportunity for engagement. 

Place at least one of these clickable elements above the fold.  One way to make your emails more clickable is to make your clickable elements, whether it's a call-to-action button, a text link, or a clickable image, near the beginning of your email.  This is especially useful for mobile users.  Mobile tends to require a lot of scrolling, and sometimes squinting, pinching and zooming.  Giving a recipient something actionable that is seen upon opening can lead to more clicks in this environment.










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To share common sense lessons learned with 40-plus years experience in marketing, sales and as a B2B publisher.

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I'm really just a "mature" guy picking up experience along the way. If only by osmosis, I've observed what works and what doesn't work under the marketing umbrella -- with 11 years in sales and marketing at Procter & Gamble; 30-plus years in B2B publishing (including three years as a publisher); and 1,000's of calls on every size company starting with the likes of Microsoft and Hewlett-Packard all the way down to small, brash start-ups.

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