Friday, August 19, 2011

How To Improve Landing Pages


1. Match the headline of the landing page to the corresponding call to action. Keep the messaging consistent on both your CTA and the headline of the landing page. If people click a link for a free offer and then find out there's a catch on the landing page, you'll instantly lose their trust. Similarly, if the headline reads differently than the CTA, it might lead to confusion., and the user might wonder if the CTA linked to a wrong page.

2. Be clear about what you're offering. This is the most common mistake with landing pages. People often try to be too clever or witty with the headline...and the offer isn't clear. Again, if you're givng away a free whitepaper, say "Download our FREE Whitepaer for Improving X." Plain and simple.

3. Improve the positioning above the form. Just like you want to have your call to action above the fold, it's ideal for this form to be above the fold as well. This way, there can't be any confusion as to what's expected from the visitor on this page. They simply need to fill out the form to get what you're offering.

4. Keep the text concise and easy to scan. Be brief and to the point. It's the offer where you give the prospect more information. In addition to your headline, have a brief paragraph explaining the offer followed by a few bullet points outlining what the offer consists of to include the benefits.

5. Remove links and navigation to maintain focus. When a prospect reaches your landing page, you're just a few keystrokes away from getting their contact information. So don't distract them with links that we'll take them further away from your goal to get a lead.

Next time: How to improve offers.

No comments:

Post a Comment

Note: Only a member of this blog may post a comment.

MY OBJECTIVE:

To share common sense lessons learned with 40-plus years experience in marketing, sales and as a B2B publisher.

About Me

My photo
I'm really just a "mature" guy picking up experience along the way. If only by osmosis, I've observed what works and what doesn't work under the marketing umbrella -- with 11 years in sales and marketing at Procter & Gamble; 30-plus years in B2B publishing (including three years as a publisher); and 1,000's of calls on every size company starting with the likes of Microsoft and Hewlett-Packard all the way down to small, brash start-ups.

Followers