Sunday, November 28, 2010

Why Branding Is Important



Brand Awareness Is Designed To Generate Customer Loyalty


It is the choosing of one brand versus another. Brand awareness and identity are components of a strategy to persuade a customer that its brand is reliable and trustworthy. Branding is no longer just the idea of logos, color schemes and a company's tagline of who they think they are. It is now tied into the perception of the customer and what they think and say about the brand.


What does your customer think about your company and brand? It matters what your customers are saying. Customers are using social media groups to share their thoughts about a company's products, services and brand. They are asking where they can get a particular product and getting answers back from tweets to Facebook posts. Is your brand being tweeted about, posted on Facebook or talked about on other social networks? It's not what you know, but it's who you know in today's social media marketing.


Why did you choose to purchase a Dell computer intead of a Gateway computer? Microsoft, Hewlett-Packard, Macy's, Tiffany's, Target and other companies are excellent examples of having the ability to win customer loyalty. Building brand awareness is more than providing a product or service. Customers want to purchase from reliable and trusted sources.


The customer's perception is an idea that they have or do not have about your company. All too often, companies strive for short-term results rather than long-term relationships that cultivate brand loyalty. A company that builds a strong brand is better protected from the impact of competitors. It also serves as a way to differentiate a company or product.

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To share common sense lessons learned with 40-plus years experience in marketing, sales and as a B2B publisher.

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I'm really just a "mature" guy picking up experience along the way. If only by osmosis, I've observed what works and what doesn't work under the marketing umbrella -- with 11 years in sales and marketing at Procter & Gamble; 30-plus years in B2B publishing (including three years as a publisher); and 1,000's of calls on every size company starting with the likes of Microsoft and Hewlett-Packard all the way down to small, brash start-ups.

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