Tuesday, March 11, 2014

There Is A Role For Print

 
 
 
Yes, in the era of iPads and Apps, there is still a role for print.  As a B2B marketer, there is an opportunity here.  Here's why in my mind:
 
Getting Attention: Have you noticed how many fewer magazines you're getting in the mail these days? There's just less mail, so more attention is paid to each piece.
 
No Audience Development Costs: Publishers expend huge amounts of time and money qualifying subscribers.  Many times, publishers invest multiple dollars per subscriber for auditing purposes (BPA Statement).  They send direct mail, they call, they send email so that the magazine can report subscribers requesting the magazine. That's a cost marketers don't have to worry about.
 
Prospects Still Need To Ask Questions: We love the Internet because buyers can find answers to almost anything.  But where do we go to think about what questions we should be asking? The web is where we go to get answers but print is where we go to learn questions. The print vehicle is still the best medium for thinking outside the box to ask tough questions based on what your read. 
 
Print Still Excites People: The printed word is still perceived as more credible to many people than anything on the web. It goes to the old adage, "If someone invested enough to print and mail it, it must be important."
 
Customer Retention: Recent research studies highlight how print is still best for customer retention to build brand awareness.
 
Unplug: More and more people are actively choosing to unplug, or disconnect themselves from digital media. I'm dong this myself. I'm finding myself turning off my phone and email more to engage with printed material. 
 
 
 
 

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MY OBJECTIVE:

To share common sense lessons learned with 40-plus years experience in marketing, sales and as a B2B publisher.

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I'm really just a "mature" guy picking up experience along the way. If only by osmosis, I've observed what works and what doesn't work under the marketing umbrella -- with 11 years in sales and marketing at Procter & Gamble; 30-plus years in B2B publishing (including three years as a publisher); and 1,000's of calls on every size company starting with the likes of Microsoft and Hewlett-Packard all the way down to small, brash start-ups.

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