Thursday, June 6, 2013

Forgetting To Fish Where The Fish Are






 
 
 
 
Make sure your line is always baited and in the water. In other words, you must have your message in front of customers and prospects on a regular basis. Sporadic advertising efforts that come and go will cause you to miss out on significant chunks of sales opportunity. It's not the case of the big fish that got away; the big fist never new about you. Make sure you're attracting prospects while they are looking which should be every day, 365 days a year.
 
Today, virtually all engineering, technical and industrial buyers use print and online resources throughout their buying processes, including locating suppliers, manufacturers, components and products. That means you must make investments in appropriate media to reach this audience and forge more, and more frequent, connections with customers and prospects.
 
Focusing on lead quantity versus lead quality.
 
More leads! More leads! This may be your strategy, but it's more effective to have a balanced focus on both lead quantitity and lead quality. If marketing focuses lead generation efforts solely on quantity, fewer leads will convert to customers, more sales resources are wasted, and sales people will quickly learn to distrust leads that marketing generates. Ask any sales rep. They will tell you they'd rather have a handful of highly qualified prospects than a suitcase full of unqualified leads.
 
Abandoning brand exposure.
 
Brand exposure is so important, but some companies shove it aside in order to increase emphasis on lead generation. Yet, continually exposing customers and prospects to your brand keeps your compnay top of mind, increases lead generation opportunities and helps reduce sales cycle because prospects will already be familiar with your brand and value proposition.


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To share common sense lessons learned with 40-plus years experience in marketing, sales and as a B2B publisher.

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I'm really just a "mature" guy picking up experience along the way. If only by osmosis, I've observed what works and what doesn't work under the marketing umbrella -- with 11 years in sales and marketing at Procter & Gamble; 30-plus years in B2B publishing (including three years as a publisher); and 1,000's of calls on every size company starting with the likes of Microsoft and Hewlett-Packard all the way down to small, brash start-ups.

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