Thursday, July 8, 2010

Customer Loyalty Matters - Part II




Three more tips to deepen relationships with customers, establish greater levels of trust, and build stronger customer loyalty...


Understand what customers are paying for,
We like to believe customers are paying for our expertise. Yet, most customers cannot evaluate our expertise. So they simply assume we are experts by virtue of our brand credentials. What customers can assess is whether they experience positive outcomes, if the relationship they have with you is meaningful, if they feel valued, and if they receive a high level of service.

Outcome matters.
Practicing good interpersonal skills and maintaining solid customer relationships ae important for developing customer loyalty. But what really matters to customers are results they can see, count on, and talk about. Customers might come to you a few times because you have the right product or service for their needs, but they won't keep coming back to you based on your business personality alone. Customers must trust you to help them. They must see results and learn something from you to make it worth their while to continue as your customer.

Integrity leads to trust, which leads to a relationship.
Integrity involves fundamental behavior such as keeping your word, being honest, providing a consistent level of service, and being reliable. Building trust requires a business to continually put the customer's interests ahead of their own and display a genuine "other' orientation. You demonstrate that by being interested reather than interesting, and by not treating every interaction as an opportunity to share your message. Without integrity, there is no trust. Without trust, there is no enduring relationship.

No comments:

Post a Comment

Note: Only a member of this blog may post a comment.

MY OBJECTIVE:

To share common sense lessons learned with 40-plus years experience in marketing, sales and as a B2B publisher.

About Me

My photo
I'm really just a "mature" guy picking up experience along the way. If only by osmosis, I've observed what works and what doesn't work under the marketing umbrella -- with 11 years in sales and marketing at Procter & Gamble; 30-plus years in B2B publishing (including three years as a publisher); and 1,000's of calls on every size company starting with the likes of Microsoft and Hewlett-Packard all the way down to small, brash start-ups.

Followers